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  • Writer's pictureBrian Foley

Houston Criminal Defense Attorney - Fighting Misdemeanor Theft Charges

Fighting Misdemeanor Theft Charges in Houston, Texas


Theft is considered a criminal offense in Houston, Texas, and can carry serious consequences for those who are convicted. In Texas, theft can be classified as either a misdemeanor or a felony, depending on the value of the property stolen and the circumstances surrounding the crime. Misdemeanor theft charges are typically less serious than felony charges, but they can still result in a criminal record, fines, and even jail time. If you have been charged with misdemeanor theft in Houston, it is important to take the matter seriously and take steps to defend yourself in court.


Understanding Misdemeanor Theft in Houston


In Houston, theft is defined as the intentional taking of property that belongs to another person without their consent. Theft can be committed in a variety of ways, including shoplifting, embezzlement, larceny, and fraud. In Texas, the severity of the charges for theft depends on the value of the property that was stolen. If the value of the property is less than $100, the crime is classified as a Class C Misdemeanor. If the value of the property is between $100 and $750, the crime is classified as a Class B Misdemeanor. If the value of the property is greater than $750, the crime is classified as a Class A Misdemeanor.


Penalties for Misdemeanor Theft in Houston


The penalties for a Class C Misdemeanor in Houston can include a fine of up to $500. The penalties for a Class B Misdemeanor can include up to 180 days in jail and a fine of up to $2,000. The penalties for a Class A Misdemeanor can include up to one year in jail and a fine of up to $4,000. In addition to these penalties, a conviction for theft can also result in a criminal record, which can make it difficult to find employment or housing in the future.


Defending Against Misdemeanor Theft Charges in Houston


If you have been charged with misdemeanor theft in Houston, it is important to take steps to defend yourself in court. There are several defenses that can be used to fight these charges, including:

  1. Lack of intent: In order to be convicted of theft, the prosecution must be able to prove that you intended to steal the property. If you did not intend to steal the property, you may be able to use this as a defense in court.

  2. Mistake of fact: If you believed that the property belonged to you, or that you had a right to take it, you may be able to use this as a defense.

  3. False accusation: If you were falsely accused of theft, you may be able to use this as a defense in court.

  4. Insufficient evidence: If the prosecution does not have enough evidence to prove that you committed the crime, you may be able to use this as a defense.

It is important to work with an experienced criminal defense attorney if you have been charged with misdemeanor theft in Houston. An experienced attorney will be able to review the evidence against you and help you determine the best defense strategy for your case.



Conclusion


If you have been charged with misdemeanor theft in Houston, it is important to take the matter seriously and take steps to defend yourself in court. An experienced criminal defense attorney can help you understand the charges against you and develop a defense strategy to fight the charges. With the right legal representation, you may be able to avoid a criminal record, jail time, and other penalties associated with a theft conviction.


For litigants who do not have counsel: Reading this blog post does not create an attorney client relationship. Call to set up a free consultation.


For the general public: This Blog/Web Site is for educational purposes only and it provides general information and a general understanding of the law, but does not provide specific legal advice. By using this site, commenting on posts, or sending inquiries through the site or contact email, you confirm that there is no attorney-client relationship created. Don't just read this as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed attorney.


For attorneys: This Blog is informational and educational in nature and is not a substitute for Westlaw or other research and consultation on specific matters pertaining to your clients. As you know the law can change day to day based on recent case opinions. And unfortunately you shouldn't cite it in court as binding authority because it is not. Mention it to your friends, just seek real consultation if it’s something important.

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