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  • Writer's pictureBrian Foley

Houston Criminal Defense Attorney - Texas Code of Criminal Procedure Art. 2.025

Article 2.025 imposes a duty on District or County Attorneys when they are paid money related to child support. The article requires the DA to transfer any child support payments received by the DA to a local registry or Title IV-D agency.


In Texas, the local registry is a database that is maintained by the Office of the Attorney General (OAG) and is used to track child support payments. The local registry is a centralized system that allows the OAG to receive and disburse child support payments on behalf of the custodial parent (the parent who is not the primary caregiver).


If you have been ordered to pay child support in Texas, your payments will be deposited into the local registry and disbursed to the custodial parent by the OAG. The local registry allows the OAG to ensure that child support payments are made consistently and on time, and allows custodial parents to track the status of their payments.

If you are a custodial parent who is receiving child support payments through the local registry, you can access information about your payments online or by contacting the OAG. If you are a noncustodial parent who is making child support payments through the local registry, you can also access information about your payments online or by contacting the OAG.


A Title IV-D agency is a government agency that is responsible for enforcing and administering child support laws and programs. In Texas, the Title IV-D agency is the Office of the Attorney General (OAG), which is responsible for enforcing and administering child support laws and programs under Title IV-D of the federal Social Security Act.

The OAG works with parents, employers, and other agencies to establish, modify, and enforce child support orders. The OAG also provides a range of services to help parents who are seeking child support, including assistance with locating noncustodial parents, establishing paternity, and setting up and enforcing child support orders.


Art. 2.025. SPECIAL DUTY OF DISTRICT OR COUNTY ATTORNEY RELATING TO CHILD SUPPORT. If a district or county attorney receives money from a person who is required by a court order to pay child support through a local registry or the Title IV-D agency and the money is presented to the attorney as payment for the court-ordered child support, the attorney shall transfer the money to the local registry or Title IV-D agency designated as the place of payment in the child support order. Added by Acts 1999, 76th Leg., ch. 40, Sec. 1, eff. Sept. 1, 1999.


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